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Harvest to begin on Titirangi

18 Mar 2015

Harvest to begin on Titirangi

Harvesting of the 8 hectares of radiata pine trees on Titirangi Reserve is due to start next Monday 23 March.
“The plan is to harvest the pines and restore the reserve with native plants and continuing to remove weeds and exotic trees,” says acting group manager planning and development, Geoff Canham.
Most walking tracks will still be open and accessible from the seaside face of the hill.
For safety, the main road over the hill will be closed to all public vehicles, bikes and pedestrians for the duration of the harvest which is likely to be completed by 1 May.
“We advise people to follow instructions from contractors and signage and make sure you are in a safe viewing area if you want to see the harvest in action.”
Council and Ngati Oneone are working together to revitalise the natural values of Titirangi Reserve also known as Kaiti Hill.
Mayor Meng Foon is delighted that this project is gaining momentum and thanks Ngati oneone for their support and fully supports co-management of the maunga tapu a Titirangi.
Mayor Foon asks that people be safe and exercise common sense when the trees are being extracted.
“Please be patient it’s only about 6 weeks work and then you can use the maunga again.”
A total of $1.3m will be invested in the reserve overall to re-vegetate and revitalise our city’s largest landmark over the next 3 years.
“A harvest in the city area is very unique. We’ve planned the harvest carefully to lower the risk of damage to the landscape and preserve sites of cultural and historic value,” says Mr Canham.
Archaeological authority was issued by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga, archaeologist Lynda Walter and Ngati Oneone will be monitoring cultural and archaeological features within the project zone.
The replanting programme will aim to restore the natural environment of the reserve with up to 40,000 native plants.
“The outcome of the restoration is to encourage habitats for native bird and animal species, open up views, improve visual appeal and enhance walkways and viewing points that fit within the natural environment.”
We’re encouraging the community to get involved in community planting days and restoring work once we’ve finalised the species mix with iwi and firmed up the programme.
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